• Robyn

AD712 FX AND PROSTHETICS ESSENTIALS 18S1

Week 1 – Brian Kinney: Pro Bondo





In week one of the Prosthetics and Sculpting MA at CMS, Pinewood Studios, we had the pleasure of meeting Brian Kinney, who demonstrated the advantages of Pro Bondo transfers.



Brian Kinney is a prime time Emmy-nominated makeup artist and a Journeyman in IATSE Local 706 Make-up Artists and Hairstylists Guild in Hollywood. For more than fifteen years, Brian has been professionally working in film, television, theatre, and print.

Originally from Chicago, Illinois, Brian received his BA from the University of Iowa. Upon graduation he moved to London, England to train in makeup artistry at the Delamar Academy.

Brian has made his mark in FX labs, on set, and in classrooms across North America and Europe. His work can be seen regularly in feature films and television shows, such as Scenic Route, Insidious, and CSI:NY.






So, more than qualified to be teaching us what is Pro Bondo, right?


Pro Bondo goes by many names including Prosthetic Transfers, Pros Aide Transfer, 3D Transfers or simply Bondo. Whatever name you like to use, the product stays the same: an acrylic adhesive based material used with translucent flat plate transfer mould to create cuts, scars, eye bags and even aging pieces.


Why is Pro Bondo so useful? 


Pro Bondo is the key to seamless continuity! Everyone wants an easy life and Pro Bondo allows you to apply directly from the mould and it takes a relatively small amount of time to make, fill and apply compared to its predecessor, the silicone appliance. It’s also much easier compared to applying the wound in platinum based silicone like Sculpt Gel, 3rd Degree or Skin Sculpt which of course even if you are a very skilled pro you will struggle to replicate the wound accurately when sculpting it directly onto the skin. 


Once the Bondo has been applied directly from the mould, the mould is then ready to be reused. Simply clean, release, refill and leave overnight to set. It's.that.easy. And it makes continuity issues a thing of the past. 

Instructions:


Begin by cleaning your mould. A quick wash with IPA will ensure your mould is clean. 

·

Use a release agent such as Release and Seal, Vaseline or Ultra Par 4. Our personal favourite is Release and Seal


Whether you use the above technique or not, the next step is to fill your mould. Be extremely careful!! You need to make sure that you make the edges as thin as possible. Another top tip is to use business cards; the bonus being that these are disposable. Alternatively, a palette knife or a scrapper will do the job just as well. 


Leave to cure. Factors such as the size of the mould and the temperature of the room will all contribute to how long this will take. To be on the safe side, we recommend leaving it to cure overnight. If you want to speed up the process, you can pop it in a dehumidifier. Failing that, an airing cupboard will work too. 


REMEMBER KEEP THEM SOMEWHERE SAFE. THEY NEED TO STAY FLAT AND OUT OF HARMS WAY. IF ANYTHING TOUCHES THE TOP IT WILL STICK AND YOUR PIECE WILL BE RUINED. SOME GOOD STORE SOLUTIONS ARE PIZZA BOX, TUPPERWEAR, PINNING TO FOAM BOARD IN A NICE CONTAINER.


Apply the piece straight from the mould


Colour the piece using illustrator palette


(additional info curtesy of The Make-up Armoury)



I found Pro Bondo is pretty fun to play with. Although it's very simple and straight forward, there are plenty of variables to keep it interesting. It's available in a few different colours these days, you can add flocking, and even cap plastic. The experimentation montage below is living proof...




We didn't get a great deal of time for our Pro-Bondo's to set up, so the results were a little iffy, but there's definitely something to work with....




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